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Calvin made his first visit to Cold Spring Harbor in 1914 while still a graduate student in Morgan’s lab and later recalls the visit as “full of very pleasant memories.”

Nº 2

The family often spent summers on the farm in Schuyler Falls as well as at Isle La Motte on Lake Champlain. There was also travel to the scientific encampment at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to California, to Cold Spring Harbor, and elsewhere. “Calvin was intensely focused on his scientific work” his daughter Betsey remembers “He used to come home with flies in his socks. He somehow couldn’t detach himself.”

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Travel through time 

discovering moments in the life of the Bridges family in the late 19th century and early 20th century.

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Nº 1

Calvin Bridges paid $2 per week for tent rental and $7 per week for his meals at Blackford Hall; he was provided with $300 for travel and living expenses. For his 1936 stay, he was offered $100 per month “in lieu of travel and living expenses for a minimum 6-week stay” that was not to exceed $300.

Nº 3

Controversy – social, political, and scientific – was also a part of Calvin’s life. He was an early supporter of the nascent birth control movement, following through with his own vasectomy. Bridges’ romantic life was also an item of controversy. Ed Novitski recounts Theodosius Dobzhansky’s discussing “with relative strangers and in a joking way details of Bridges’ romantic affairs. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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