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PAST EVENTS

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Fly Microscopy: Origins of Gene Research

April 27, May 4, May 11, 2013 | 7pm

 Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

This class is tailored for those who are interested in scientific visualization, model organism research and transforming scientific data into visual imagery.  The material is significant because the history of fruit fly genetics has provided the groundwork for understanding human disease, behavior and development. The fruit fly is a simple genetic model system and many of the genes present in fruit flies are conserved in humans.


Mendel to Morgan & Beyond

Stuart Firestein & Martin Chalfie | July 24, 2013 | 7pm

Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

The science of genetics from its beginnings in pea pods to the whole human genome by way of Thomas Hunt Morgan and his flies. Stuart Firestein is Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, where his laboratory is researching the vertebrate olfactory receptor neuron. Martin Chalfie is a University Professor at Columbia University and uses the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate aspects of nerve cell development and function. He introduced the use of green fluorescent protein as a biological marker for which he shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.


Music & The Brain

Darcy Kelley | July 31, 2013 | 7pm

Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

So what is it about music that makes it powerful and evocative? Courtship songs could have the key. Darcy Kelley is a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Darcy Kelley’s research uses the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, to study the neurobiology of social communication.


The Color of Genes, or The Genes For Color

Claude Desplan | August 8, 2013 | 7pm

Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

Claude Desplan is a Silver Professor in the Department of Biology at New York University. Using Drosophila as a model system, Claude Desplan’s laboratory focuses on understanding the development and functioning of the visual system that underlies color vision.


Biological Clocks

Michael W. Young | August 14, 2013 | 7pm

Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

Michael W. Young is a Richard and Jeanne Fisher Professor at the Laboratory of Genetics at The Rockefeller University. He is one of the pioneers in discovering the molecular basis of circadian rhythms, the first demonstration of a molecular mechanism for behavior. Circadian rhythms–cyclic responses synchronized to the period of the day–are a fundamental aspect of behavior in humans and all other animals.


Germs Cells Are Forever: How To Make And Protect The Next Generation

Ruth Lehmann | August 20, 2013 | 7pm

Pioneer Works, 159 PIONEER STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11231

Born in Cologne, Germany, Ruth Lehmann was introduced to developmental biology first in Gerold Schubiger’s lab at the University of Washington, Seattle and then during her Diploma thesis in the laboratory of the late Jose Campos Ortega at the University of Freiburg, Germany, where she described the neurogenic genes in Drosophila. She completed her doctoral thesis in 1985 in the laboratory of nobel laureate Christiane Nuesslein-Volhard, where she participated in the identification of maternal effect genes that organize the embryonic axis in Drosophila. After postdoctoral training in Tübingen and at the Medical Research Council in Cambridge, UK in the laboratory of the late Mike Wilcox, she joined the Whitehead Institute and the faculty of MIT in 1988. Molecular characterization of nanos, pumilio and oskar in her lab showed that RNA localization within a cell is tightly linked to translational regulation. In 1996, she moved to the Skirball Institute at NYU School of Medicine where she is an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Here she used genetics and live-imaging methods to demonstrate the role of lipid signaling in germ cell migration. Dr. Lehmann is the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Professor of Developmental Genetics and the Director of the Skirball Institute. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts Sciences and the foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences and a foreign associate of EMBO. Her lab uses genetic, molecular and high resolution imaging approaches to study germ cell specification, migration and survival in the embryo as well as germ line stem cell maintenance and transgenerational protection of the germ line in the adult.

Writer & Director Alexis goes to Genetics Society of America Conference to talk about The Fly Room. The Fly Room writer and director has been invited to appear at the Genetics Society of America’s 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference in San Diego where he will exclusively preview The Fly Room, provide a behind the scenes tour of its creation and share the stories of the real life characters embodied in his cinematic adventure of science and emotion.

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